Every knife we sell is made to order for the customer, which allows us to have a huge range of different options available to customise the knife to suit you. However with so many options, it can be overwhelming. This page should give a rundown of the different options we offer and the advantages they'll give your blade to make the whole process a bit clearer.

Sheaths

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This style of sheath is known as a Dap and is made of two carved wooden blocks that are then wrapped in wet leather, and stitched up to fit extremely tightly. The sheath is formed with a ridge  around the throat, below which sits a tightly strung  belt loop strap known as a Frog.

This arrangement allows the blade to be worn ambidextrously on the belt with our design allowing for both horizontal and vertical carry. This is quite a light option but is our least durable sheath option and should be kept dry to avoid the organic materials decaying.
This style of sheath also relies on friction alone to keep the blade in place and so doesn't offer the same level of retention as our other designs.
Furthermore the traditional design also occasionally suffers from having the point or edge of the blade cut through the inner edge of the sheath and makes its way to the outside, requiring extra care while drawing and sheathing.

With this said though this is a platform that's been time tested over centuries and given proper care and technique these sheaths last decades of use in the hands of locals. In summation this is a simple and charming option that's a great match with our traditional blades.

Our second sheath type is what we call Western Leather, but is also known as a stacked or sandwich leather sheath.

It consists of 3 layers of thick buffalo leather stacked on top of each other which are then glued and stitched, with the middle layer having a snug fitting cavity to hold the blade.
This style of sheath has both vertical and horizontal belt loops built into the base layer as well as a dangler attachment for a lower carry that can move with you more as you pass through difficult terrain.

This sheath isn't ambidextrous but features snap retention straps for an extremely secure fit as well as a much more durable form of construction.
The thick leather and woodless construction makes for a much more weatherproof sheath that's both safer to draw and extremely tough and hard wearing. With this said, you should avoid soaking it for extended periods of time and lightly oil the exterior when needed.

This is a very practical and rugged sheath that is functionally superior to any sheath by other Nepalese makers.
This is what we'd suggest for workhorse outdoors blades that will see a lot of hard use. It comes standard on all our modern designs and is available as an option on all blades.

Our Final sheath type is of course Kydex.
Our kydex sheaths use the same basic layout as our western leather sheath but has the different carry elements split into a modular style that can be placed along any of the holes along the sides of the knife for dialing in your carry as much as possible. Looking to use a 3rd party clip or add on? We use standard spacing so it'll fit straight on.

These sheaths take all the advantages of a western leather sheath and take away the disadvantages. It's completely weatherproof, slim to fit nicely against packs, can be drawn easily with one hand and does all this with the lowest weight out of any of our offerings.

Our Craftsman Siru is the only man in Nepal skilled in Kydex work, something that he's been honing for the last 4 years after being taught the basics by Andrew. Each sheath is thermally formed perfectly to every blade for the ideal balance of retention and ease of drawing. Furthermore his skills with both stacked leather sheaths and kydex allow him to adapt every design to perfectly fit the huge range of blade lengths and designs we offer. Need custom eyelet spacing? A piggyback companion knife sheath? An integral locking mechanism? Send an email through to our custom section and he'll make it a reality.

These sheaths are perfect for a sleek modern build or wrapped around a traditional blade might just be the best representation of that we at Kailash Blades are about.

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This style of sheath is known as a Dap and is made of two carved wooden blocks that are then wrapped in wet leather, and stitched up to fit extremely tightly. The sheath is formed with a ridge  around the throat, below which sits a tightly strung  belt loop strap known as a Frog.

This arrangement allows the blade to be worn ambidextrously on the belt with our design allowing for both horizontal and vertical carry. This is quite a light option but is our least durable sheath option and should be kept dry to avoid the organic materials decaying.
This style of sheath also relies on friction alone to keep the blade in place and so doesn't offer the same level of retention as our other designs.
Furthermore the traditional design also occasionally suffers from having the point or edge of the blade cut through the inner edge of the sheath and makes its way to the outside, requiring extra care while drawing and sheathing.

With this said though this is a platform that's been time tested over centuries and given proper care and technique these sheaths last decades of use in the hands of locals. In summation this is a simple and charming option that's a great match with our traditional blades.

IMG_20190422_152045_930

Our second sheath type is what we call Western Leather, but is also known as a stacked or sandwich leather sheath.

It consists of 3 layers of thick buffalo leather stacked on top of each other which are then glued and stitched, with the middle layer having a snug fitting cavity to hold the blade.
This style of sheath has both vertical and horizontal belt loops built into the base layer as well as a dangler attachment for a lower carry that can move with you more as you pass through difficult terrain.

This sheath isn't ambidextrous but features snap retention straps for an extremely secure fit as well as a much more durable form of construction.
The thick leather and woodless construction makes for a much more weatherproof sheath that's both safer to draw and extremely tough and hard wearing. With this said, you should avoid soaking it for extended periods of time and lightly oil the exterior when needed.

This is a very practical and rugged sheath that is functionally superior to any sheath by other Nepalese makers.
This is what we'd suggest for workhorse outdoors blades that will see a lot of hard use. It comes standard on all our modern designs and is available as an option on all blades.

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Our Final sheath type is of course Kydex.
Our kydex sheaths use the same basic layout as our western leather sheath but has the different carry elements split into a modular style that can be placed along any of the holes along the sides of the knife for dialing in your carry as much as possible. Looking to use a 3rd party clip or add on? We use standard spacing so it'll fit straight on.

These sheaths take all the advantages of a western leather sheath and take away the disadvantages. It's completely weatherproof, slim to fit nicely against packs, can be drawn easily with one hand and does all this with the lowest weight out of any of our offerings.

Our Craftsman Siru is the only man in Nepal skilled in Kydex work, something that he's been honing for the last 4 years after being taught the basics by Andrew. Each sheath is thermally formed perfectly to every blade for the ideal balance of retention and ease of drawing. Furthermore his skills with both stacked leather sheaths and kydex allow him to adapt every design to perfectly fit the huge range of blade lengths and designs we offer. Need custom eyelet spacing? A piggyback companion knife sheath? An integral locking mechanism? Send an email through to our custom section and he'll make it a reality.

These sheaths are perfect for a sleek modern build or wrapped around a traditional blade might just be the best representation of that we at Kailash Blades are about.

Handle Materials

CURRENTLY ONLY AVAILABLE ON CUSTOM REQUESTS:
The most recent in a very long line of innovations from Kailash Blades, our Stacked Leather Handles bring comfort, durability and charm to our traditional and hidden tang blades. This handle is composed of a series of buffalo leather washers skewered onto a tang that are then glued and sandwiched between a metal front and rear bolster. This method manages to maintain the same unique feel in hand and weight distribution of traditional rat tail handles while introducing some massive benefits.

Shock absorption: Traditional rat tail tangs naturally offer superior shock absorption to full tang blades, but this style of handle takes it to the next level. The less dense, more fibrous nature of stacked leather helps to absorb the vibrations from chopping impacts. This reduced density can provide a slightly lighter knife overall and an even more lively feel in hand. The externally facing fibres also offer increased grip and breathability over wood and horn in particular. In the wet this is difference is even more pronounced.

Durability: While this handle may be technically softer than both wood and horn, it avoids the major drawbacks they suffer from. The way the fibres run horizontally through vertically stacked fibres ensures that cracking under impact or long term warping isn't a possibility. Furthermore the completely cured and relaxed state of the material means that it's less affected by humid or dry environments, both when in use and in terms of long term shrinking or warping over time. As with all our leather items, this handle should avoid being soaked in water for extended periods of time and should be oiled when needed.

This handle offers superior performance in the field, increased durability over standard materials on both a short and a long term basis without sacrificing the beauty and charm of what make traditional khukuris so great. All these advantages make it a perfect fit for  martial arts blades. high performance outdoors tools or any heirloom quality blades intended to last a lifetime.

CURRENTLY ONLY AVAILABLE ON CUSTOM REQUESTS:

Micarta is a handle material so well suited to knives that it's almost universal and taken for granted as an option. However throughout the years only a handful of knives have ever been made in Nepal using it. Why is that?
The answer is a bureaucratic one. Foreign materials are slapped with a massive import tax to incentivise local manufacturing within the country, however no local manufacturing or materials have been available to stand in as a replacement. This has made the use of micarta prohibitively expensive, adding almost $100usd to the cost of a blade.

Not content to let this stop us from putting out the best knives we can, we started making our own. As the first micarta manufacturers in Nepal it's been a challenging  process, but it's given us the ability to produce some really unique handle materials. All of our micarta is made using locally made textiles, upcycling scrap fabric whenever possible. Siru is always the first to adapt to and master new techniques and as a result is even capable of producing small runs of experimental scales. Any non standard micarta will be shown on instagram for those interested. Commissioning a custom blade? For the right price he might be able to do you some bespoke micarta to match.

For those unfamiliar with Micarta, it's considered by many to be the holy grail of knife materials. It's completely waterproof, doesn't shrink or swell in humid or dry environments and is grippy, wet or dry. It's easy to clean, difficult to scratch and damn near impossible to break. On our full tang blade, premade scales are glued and riveted on before being shaped, however on our hidden and rat tail tang blades the fabric and resin is wrapped and layered directly around the tang for each blade for a truly perfect fit.

Our micarta handles are the most durable handle we offer by a wide margin and are perfectly at home on any blade of ours that is going to be worked HARD no matter how big or small. They perform wonderfully, look cool and have a lot more story behind them than what you'd find on your typical knife.

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CURRENTLY ONLY AVAILABLE ON CUSTOM REQUESTS:
The most recent in a very long line of innovations from Kailash Blades, our Stacked Leather Handles bring comfort, durability and charm to our traditional and hidden tang blades. This handle is composed of a series of buffalo leather washers skewered onto a tang that are then glued and sandwiched between a metal front and rear bolster. This method manages to maintain the same unique feel in hand and weight distribution of traditional rat tail handles while introducing some massive benefits.

Shock absorption: Traditional rat tail tangs naturally offer superior shock absorption to full tang blades, but this style of handle takes it to the next level. The less dense, more fibrous nature of stacked leather helps to absorb the vibrations from chopping impacts. This reduced density can provide a slightly lighter knife overall and an even more lively feel in hand. The externally facing fibres also offer increased grip and breathability over wood and horn in particular. In the wet this is difference is even more pronounced.

Durability: While this handle may be technically softer than both wood and horn, it avoids the major drawbacks they suffer from. The way the fibres run horizontally through vertically stacked fibres ensures that cracking under impact or long term warping isn't a possibility. Furthermore the completely cured and relaxed state of the material means that it's less affected by humid or dry environments, both when in use and in terms of long term shrinking or warping over time. As with all our leather items, this handle should avoid being soaked in water for extended periods of time and should be oiled when needed.

This handle offers superior performance in the field, increased durability over standard materials on both a short and a long term basis without sacrificing the beauty and charm of what make traditional khukuris so great. All these advantages make it a perfect fit for  martial arts blades. high performance outdoors tools or any heirloom quality blades intended to last a lifetime.

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CURRENTLY ONLY AVAILABLE ON CUSTOM REQUESTS:

Micarta is a handle material so well suited to knives that it's almost universal and taken for granted as an option. However throughout the years only a handful of knives have ever been made in Nepal using it. Why is that?
The answer is a bureaucratic one. Foreign materials are slapped with a massive import tax to incentivise local manufacturing within the country, however no local manufacturing or materials have been available to stand in as a replacement. This has made the use of micarta prohibitively expensive, adding almost $100usd to the cost of a blade.

Not content to let this stop us from putting out the best knives we can, we started making our own. As the first micarta manufacturers in Nepal it's been a challenging  process, but it's given us the ability to produce some really unique handle materials. All of our micarta is made using locally made textiles, upcycling scrap fabric whenever possible. Siru is always the first to adapt to and master new techniques and as a result is even capable of producing small runs of experimental scales. Any non standard micarta will be shown on instagram for those interested. Commissioning a custom blade? For the right price he might be able to do you some bespoke micarta to match.

For those unfamiliar with Micarta, it's considered by many to be the holy grail of knife materials. It's completely waterproof, doesn't shrink or swell in humid or dry environments and is grippy, wet or dry. It's easy to clean, difficult to scratch and damn near impossible to break. On our full tang blade, premade scales are glued and riveted on before being shaped, however on our hidden and rat tail tang blades the fabric and resin is wrapped and layered directly around the tang for each blade for a truly perfect fit.

Our micarta handles are the most durable handle we offer by a wide margin and are perfectly at home on any blade of ours that is going to be worked HARD no matter how big or small. They perform wonderfully, look cool and have a lot more story behind them than what you'd find on your typical knife.

IMG_20190422_100656_543

Indian rosewood is a dense, fragrant and oily wood that has a beautiful darker grain that can range from chocolate all the way through to burgundy. It's these traits in particular that have made rosewood worldwide so sought after and indeed overharvested to the brink of being wiped out.

The rosewood we use is from Dalbergia Sissoo, a local species that isn't threatened at all and is farmed sustainably in our region's foothills.

As a handle material it's attractive, hard wearing and shrinks and swells the least out of our standard materials making it a great value option for blades looking at a long and hard service life.

White rosewood is actually the same species of wood as our Indian Rosewood, but just comes from a different part of the tree. The dark brown wood is the heartwood, while this uniformly cream wood comes from the sapwood on the outside of the tree.

This sapwood isn't as hard as the darker wood and also requires more frequent oiling as it isn't as naturally resistant to rot or insect attack. However it is significantly lighter and can look extremely striking when paired with a dark blade or brass fittings.

This wood is a great match for display pieces, martial arts blades or for heavy users who are prepared to give their blades a little more care,

In Nepal cows are holy and sacred animals, prized for their milk and religious significance. The consumption of their meat is illegal and frowned upon, however for the most part the water buffalo replaces the animal both as a beast of burden and as a producer of meat. All of our Buffalo horn is a byproduct of the local meat industry and is a material we're particularly picky with. It's colour can range from a lustrous black through to a dark greyish cream colour, with milky veins being found on some lucky pieces.  Horn is our hardest and most impact resistant organic material, being extremely hardy and difficult to crack. At the same time though it's the least stable in terms of shrinking and swelling in differing humidities and is prone to warping or shrinking over time, though it still remains usable throughout. It's a particularly beautiful and interesting material that's just as home on a display piece as it is on a workhorse blade. It's exceptionally well suited to rat tail blades as the shrinking issues are lessened due to the construction methods.

raw ek chirra 4

Indian rosewood is a dense, fragrant and oily wood that has a beautiful darker grain that can range from chocolate all the way through to burgundy. It's these traits in particular that have made rosewood worldwide so sought after and indeed overharvested to the brink of being wiped out.

The rosewood we use is from Dalbergia Sissoo, a local species that isn't threatened at all and is farmed sustainably in our region's foothills.

As a handle material it's attractive, hard wearing and shrinks and swells the least out of our standard materials making it a great value option for blades looking at a long and hard service life.

IMG_20190422_100656_543

White rosewood is actually the same species of wood as our Indian Rosewood, but just comes from a different part of the tree. The dark brown wood is the heartwood, while this uniformly cream wood comes from the sapwood on the outside of the tree.

This sapwood isn't as hard as the darker wood and also requires more frequent oiling as it isn't as naturally resistant to rot or insect attack. However it is significantly lighter and can look extremely striking when paired with a dark blade or brass fittings.

This wood is a great match for display pieces, martial arts blades or for heavy users who are prepared to give their blades a little more care,

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In Nepal cows are holy and sacred animals, prized for their milk and religious significance. The consumption of their meat is illegal and frowned upon, however for the most part the water buffalo replaces the animal both as a beast of burden and as a producer of meat. All of our Buffalo horn is a byproduct of the local meat industry and is a material we're particularly picky with. It's colour can range from a lustrous black through to a dark greyish cream colour, with milky veins being found on some lucky pieces.  Horn is our hardest and most impact resistant organic material, being extremely hardy and difficult to crack. At the same time though it's the least stable in terms of shrinking and swelling in differing humidities and is prone to warping or shrinking over time, though it still remains usable throughout. It's a particularly beautiful and interesting material that's just as home on a display piece as it is on a workhorse blade. It's exceptionally well suited to rat tail blades as the shrinking issues are lessened due to the construction methods.

Blade Finishes

Our roughest level of finish is what we call Raw, but would also be known by some as forge finish, brut de forge etc.

What this means and how it will look is different for each particular blade, so it's worth explaining in a bit more detail. If the sides of the blade don't need grinding to shape them, they'll be left with the rough texturing of the hammer marks from forging as well as the scale from quenching and tempering, for example the side of this mini. If the area of the blade does need grinding then it'll be smooth and uniform but will be left with the dark scale from quenching and tempering. If the knife has a fuller, a western ricasso or flat sides hgiher up these areas will all be black like that. Edges, some spines and some thinner grinds will all be brought to satin.
This is a visually striking finish that does a great job of showing the handmade aspects of how the knife was made. It's also low maintenance, looks good with scratches and patina and the forge black helps fight rust and holds oil well. The handle and fittings will also be brought to a rough satin finish to match the overall look and give extra grip. This is a great finish for very rough workhorses and those that are looking for a visceral, raw look to their knives in general.

Our second level of finish is known as Satin and is probably something you're quite familiar with.

It's a smooth and uniform finish that's come fresh off a fine sanding belt but that still has small visble scratches running along it. This finish looks great, isn't very reflective, holds oil well and is easy to maintain. This finish is often the best way to show off the crisp edges and grind lines on a more modern or fullered blade as polishing can round them off slightly. It can either accrue scratches and develop a patina with use or it can be brought back to factory with a scotch brite pad in about a minute. If you want to force a patina, this is a great starting point and because the steel is nicely surfaced, it can be poished nicely later with ease if you want to give it a try.The handle and fittings are similarly brought to a smooth high grit finish, but left unpolished for grip and comfort.

All of these strengths make it an excellent all round, versatile finish that's not out of place on any knife. It's the default option on just about all of our knives for this reason.

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Our roughest level of finish is what we call Raw, but would also be known by some as forge finish, brut de forge etc.

What this means and how it will look is different for each particular blade, so it's worth explaining in a bit more detail. If the sides of the blade don't need grinding to shape them, they'll be left with the rough texturing of the hammer marks from forging as well as the scale from quenching and tempering, for example the side of this mini. If the area of the blade does need grinding then it'll be smooth and uniform but will be left with the dark scale from quenching and tempering. If the knife has a fuller, a western ricasso or flat sides hgiher up these areas will all be black like that. Edges, some spines and some thinner grinds will all be brought to satin.
This is a visually striking finish that does a great job of showing the handmade aspects of how the knife was made. It's also low maintenance, looks good with scratches and patina and the forge black helps fight rust and holds oil well. The handle and fittings will also be brought to a rough satin finish to match the overall look and give extra grip. This is a great finish for very rough workhorses and those that are looking for a visceral, raw look to their knives in general.

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Our second level of finish is known as Satin and is probably something you're quite familiar with.

It's a smooth and uniform finish that's come fresh off a fine sanding belt but that still has small visble scratches running along it. This finish looks great, isn't very reflective, holds oil well and is easy to maintain. This finish is often the best way to show off the crisp edges and grind lines on a more modern or fullered blade as polishing can round them off slightly. It can either accrue scratches and develop a patina with use or it can be brought back to factory with a scotch brite pad in about a minute. If you want to force a patina, this is a great starting point and because the steel is nicely surfaced, it can be poished nicely later with ease if you want to give it a try.The handle and fittings are similarly brought to a smooth high grit finish, but left unpolished for grip and comfort.

All of these strengths make it an excellent all round, versatile finish that's not out of place on any knife. It's the default option on just about all of our knives for this reason.

Much like buffalo horn, our Polished finish is a very beautiful option with a mixture of advantages and disadvantages in terms of durability.

The polishing process closes up the pores in the steel making it inherently more rust resistant, however this smooth surface makes it hard for oil to properly coat the blade. Scratches and blemishes on the surface from use will stick out a lot and will require a fair bit of elbow grease with brasso periodically to bring it back to factory finish. As mentioned previously, actual ridges and corners can become rounded through this finish but this is more that made up for visually as the mirror polish highlights the sculpting of your blade as it bounces off the bevels and curves. It's worth noting that when the edge is buffed it can introduce a small unnecessary temper that negatively affects our heat treat. Given enough time and resharpenings though, fresh unaffected steel can be reached underneath. The handle and fittings are similarly brought to a high level of polish to show off the materials to the best of our ability. Buffalo horn in particular looks incredible when polished.

This is a stunning finish though and is a perfect fit for a martial arts blade, display piece or a user in the hands of someone that's truly dedicated to their khukuri.

CURRENTLY ONLY AVAILABLE ON CUSTOM REQUESTS:

Our final finish option is called an Acid Wash and is both another first for Nepal and something we're extremely proud of. Due to the unique way that we heat treat our blades compared to the rest of Nepal, we actually produce a distinct boundary between the hardened steel along the edge and the softer steel along the spine. There are reports online of it being impossible to produce a hamon from 5160, but after significant experimentation we've been able to refine a process that brings this crucial part of our process to the surface for the world to see.

Functionally, our acid washed knives are identical to those with a satin finish aside from significantly improved corrosion resistance over the entire blade from the factory. Over time the hamon line can become less distinct as scratches and other oxidation integrates the line into the overall patina, however this is a natural process woth embracing for the beauty it adds to a blade. For those interested in a stunning display or martial arts blade that makes a statement about the handmade nature of their knife, this is a finish definitely worth thinking about.

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Much like buffalo horn, our Polished finish is a very beautiful option with a mixture of advantages and disadvantages in terms of durability.

The polishing process closes up the pores in the steel making it inherently more rust resistant, however this smooth surface makes it hard for oil to properly coat the blade. Scratches and blemishes on the surface from use will stick out a lot and will require a fair bit of elbow grease with brasso periodically to bring it back to factory finish. As mentioned previously, actual ridges and corners can become rounded through this finish but this is more that made up for visually as the mirror polish highlights the sculpting of your blade as it bounces off the bevels and curves. It's worth noting that when the edge is buffed it can introduce a small unnecessary temper that negatively affects our heat treat. Given enough time and resharpenings though, fresh unaffected steel can be reached underneath. The handle and fittings are similarly brought to a high level of polish to show off the materials to the best of our ability. Buffalo horn in particular looks incredible when polished.

This is a stunning finish though and is a perfect fit for a martial arts blade, display piece or a user in the hands of someone that's truly dedicated to their khukuri.

48357259_2850608634965410_1576593837646675968_o

CURRENTLY ONLY AVAILABLE ON CUSTOM REQUESTS:

Our final finish option is called an Acid Wash and is both another first for Nepal and something we're extremely proud of. Due to the unique way that we heat treat our blades compared to the rest of Nepal, we actually produce a distinct boundary between the hardened steel along the edge and the softer steel along the spine. There are reports online of it being impossible to produce a hamon from 5160, but after significant experimentation we've been able to refine a process that brings this crucial part of our process to the surface for the world to see.

Functionally, our acid washed knives are identical to those with a satin finish aside from significantly improved corrosion resistance over the entire blade from the factory. Over time the hamon line can become less distinct as scratches and other oxidation integrates the line into the overall patina, however this is a natural process woth embracing for the beauty it adds to a blade. For those interested in a stunning display or martial arts blade that makes a statement about the handmade nature of their knife, this is a finish definitely worth thinking about.

Full Tang or Rat tail?

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Full tang blades are a relatively new development as far as khukuris go, having only been made in Nepal since between the late 1930's. However the handle technique has since been used on a number of standard military issue khukuris and they have a fair pedigree with the gurkhas.

Full tang handles feature a tang that is the full width of the handle, with two slabs of handle material glued and riveted on for maximum strength and durability. These handles are rose to popularity in the west as a response to the poor quality rat tail blades produced there during the 20th century, though the style has been in use internationally for centuries.

While full tang handles do provide a more bulletproof form of handle construction, they also add weight to a blade. Our full tang handles are tapered to disperse stresses and drilled out to save weight to minimise this downside, but they're still about 70-100g heavier than our rat tail handles on average and does offer a different feel in hand as a result. This makes them less suited to a martial arts blade or some user blades, but perfect for heavy outdoors blades and rough workhorses.

To put it bluntly, Rat Tail tangs have a bad reputation. In the west they've been associated with cost cutting methods and cheap blades during the 20th century. These handles had a habit of snapping under heavy use, however this had more today with the way these tangs were shaped, rather than an issue inherent to the construction method.

All our Rat Tail tangs are nice and wide where it first enters the handle, with rounded shoulders to avoid stress raisers. The tang is also annealed and tapers gradually down towards the rear of the blade to both disperse stresses more evenly while saving weight.

These handles have a big weight advantage over full tang handles, offering a very lively and unique feel in hand. They also insulate the hand from metal in cold weather as well as some of the shock from heavy chopping impacts.

But how strong are they? While definitely less hardy than a full tang handle, we're still yet to have had a customer break a single one of our rat tail blades. So while they make a lot of sense for traditional builds and martial blades keep in mind that we're confident that they're strong enough to hold their own as a workhorse blade, a role they've been dominating in Nepal for centuries.

raw ek chirra 4

Full tang blades are a relatively new development as far as khukuris go, having only been made in Nepal since between the late 1930's. However the handle technique has since been used on a number of standard military issue khukuris and they have a fair pedigree with the gurkhas.

Full tang handles feature a tang that is the full width of the handle, with two slabs of handle material glued and riveted on for maximum strength and durability. These handles are rose to popularity in the west as a response to the poor quality rat tail blades produced there during the 20th century, though the style has been in use internationally for centuries.

While full tang handles do provide a more bulletproof form of handle construction, they also add weight to a blade. Our full tang handles are tapered to disperse stresses and drilled out to save weight to minimise this downside, but they're still about 70-100g heavier than our rat tail handles on average and does offer a different feel in hand as a result. This makes them less suited to a martial arts blade or some user blades, but perfect for heavy outdoors blades and rough workhorses.

43685135_2710532062306402_1360368811550703616_o

To put it bluntly, Rat Tail tangs have a bad reputation. In the west they've been associated with cost cutting methods and cheap blades during the 20th century. These handles had a habit of snapping under heavy use, however this had more today with the way these tangs were shaped, rather than an issue inherent to the construction method.

All our Rat Tail tangs are nice and wide where it first enters the handle, with rounded shoulders to avoid stress raisers. The tang is also annealed and tapers gradually down towards the rear of the blade to both disperse stresses more evenly while saving weight.

These handles have a big weight advantage over full tang handles, offering a very lively and unique feel in hand. They also insulate the hand from metal in cold weather as well as some of the shock from heavy chopping impacts.

But how strong are they? While definitely less hardy than a full tang handle, we're still yet to have had a customer break a single one of our rat tail blades. So while they make a lot of sense for traditional builds and martial blades keep in mind that we're confident that they're strong enough to hold their own as a workhorse blade, a role they've been dominating in Nepal for centuries.

Which Length is Right for Me?

Unlike other khukuri houses, which have individual products for different lengths, we categorise our traditional blades according to blade profile and then offer a range of lengths for each one. Sometimes though this can introduce confusion and make it difficult to choose based on what your needs are. For our traditional blades we always have a default blade length, which is either the most common traditional or historical length. This is the blade length we recommend for the most representative and ideal performance for that blade style and is the length that the product description will refer to. However we also strongly consider looking into different length blades based on your specific needs.

For the sake of simplicity let's say that mid range khukuri length is 11" and a mid range sirupate length is 16".
Blades of this length will typically be the thickest at the spine, to help produce power though they're a little smaller. As blades get shorter than this they also become smaller in general, so a thinner spine helps to make sure they cut more efficiently and are better suited to the lighter, finer work they'll likely be used for. As blades grow longer than these mid range lengths they also become thinner at the spine. This is because with added length, blades gain more leverage, tip speed and power anyway, so a thinner spine helps to maintain the correct feel in hand across different sizes. It's worth nothing that this does make them less well suited to hard prying etc, but that they still produce more power than smaller blades.

Tip speed is something that we've mentioned already as a benefit of longer blades. As you swing a blade in an arc, the furthest arts of the blade travel a lot quicker than the closer parts of the blade. This makes these areas hit harder during chopping but most importantly it helps these longer blades cut through light flexible material and brush better than shorter blades. This allows some longer, thinner blades to cover a lot of the roles you'd typically need a machete for, while also offering a reach and speed advantage for martial applications.

While shorter blades miss out on this extra tip speed, they benefit from being able to pack a lot of power into a more compact package. This allows you to run, climb and pick your way through bush with a lot more freedom, both when sheathed and when in the hand. Futhermore while they do lack tip speed they're also typically faster in hand and less fatiguing in use, giving massive advantages for workhorse tools as well as martial blades.

Even as shorter blades become thinner, the fact that there's less leverage acting on them along the length of the blade means that they're just as well suited to batoning and prying. Another benefit of smaller blades is that they're typically cheaper. A smaller blade requires less time under the hammer and less grinding along the blade. This often makes them a great value option in terms of how much function you get per dollar.

IMG_20180810_222838_149

Unlike other khukuri houses, which have individual products for different lengths, we categorise our traditional blades according to blade profile and then offer a range of lengths for each one. Sometimes though this can introduce confusion and make it difficult to choose based on what your needs are. For our traditional blades we always have a default blade length, which is either the most common traditional or historical length. This is the blade length we recommend for the most representative and ideal performance for that blade style and is the length that the product description will refer to. However we also strongly consider looking into different length blades based on your specific needs.

For the sake of simplicity let's say that mid range khukuri length is 11" and a mid range sirupate length is 16".
Blades of this length will typically be the thickest at the spine, to help produce power though they're a little smaller. As blades get shorter than this they also become smaller in general, so a thinner spine helps to make sure they cut more efficiently and are better suited to the lighter, finer work they'll likely be used for. As blades grow longer than these mid range lengths they also become thinner at the spine. This is because with added length, blades gain more leverage, tip speed and power anyway, so a thinner spine helps to maintain the correct feel in hand across different sizes. It's worth nothing that this does make them less well suited to hard prying etc, but that they still produce more power than smaller blades.

IMG_20181116_151903_276

Tip speed is something that we've mentioned already as a benefit of longer blades. As you swing a blade in an arc, the furthest arts of the blade travel a lot quicker than the closer parts of the blade. This makes these areas hit harder during chopping but most importantly it helps these longer blades cut through light flexible material and brush better than shorter blades. This allows some longer, thinner blades to cover a lot of the roles you'd typically need a machete for, while also offering a reach and speed advantage for martial applications.

While shorter blades miss out on this extra tip speed, they benefit from being able to pack a lot of power into a more compact package. This allows you to run, climb and pick your way through bush with a lot more freedom, both when sheathed and when in the hand. Futhermore while they do lack tip speed they're also typically faster in hand and less fatiguing in use, giving massive advantages for workhorse tools as well as martial blades.

Even as shorter blades become thinner, the fact that there's less leverage acting on them along the length of the blade means that they're just as well suited to batoning and prying. Another benefit of smaller blades is that they're typically cheaper. A smaller blade requires less time under the hammer and less grinding along the blade. This often makes them a great value option in terms of how much function you get per dollar.

Grind types

These are really important and relate back into warranty, so they have a Page all of their own!